Accounting For Page Creep in Saddle Stitched Booklets

saddle stitched booklets

(2-min read)

You’ve sent off your brochure design to the printer. You’ve accounted for print bleed as well as image resolution (you’re becoming a real pro). Flipping through the pages, you notice that some of the page numbers in the booklet at cut off. Ah, what gives?!

A well-designed brochure or booklet is a great way to give potential customers or existing clients educational material. While this is so, some overlook a handful of design elements that result in a printed product that differs from the design they sent off. One of these is accounting for the cut that evens up page creep. 

What is Page Creep?

Saddle-stitched booklets or brochures are composed of folded longer sheets of paper. Each single sheet accounts for 2-to-4 pages. As these sheets are stacked and bound, the inner pages begin to extend or “creep” outward as the spine gets thicker. Once the book is bound together, it is trimmed to eliminate this inconsistency. This results in a flush edge of the booklet. However, the inner pages typically wind up thinner than the ones closest to the book cover. 

Designing with Page Creep in Mind

To keep the page numbers and possibly even text on the inner pages of your booklets from being trimmed off, it is important to be conservative with your use of the edges of these booklet pages. Leave enough room around the outside edges of your design with ample margins as well as sections for footers and headings. 


Still have questions about page creep? We’d be happy to help. For over 70 years, we’ve been helping businesses with every aspect of their print operations. 

Learn more about Managed Print Services from JD Young.